This Saturday, May 18 is the 44th anniversary of the eruption Mount Saint Helens eruption of May 18, 1980.

WHERE DID YOU TURN FOR INFORMATION BECAUSE THERE WAS NO INTERNET?

It was something the state had never experienced and many people were looking for information on Sunday morning at 8:32 a.m. when the mountain blew up and covered the state with ash. The internet wasn't available and CNN didn't start until June of 1980 so the only place Yakima had to turn for information was KIT Radio.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Watch Continues
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REMEMBER SHOVELING ALL THAT ASH?

44 years later we are still here and the mountain is still active. When the mountain erupted on May 18, 1980, the blast killed 57 people and eventually sent volcanic ash around the world. While the mountain blew its top it is still monitored Today. In fact the United States Geological Service or USGS monitors volcanoes in Washington and Oregon's North Cascades region through its Cascades Volcano Observatory.

Volcano Advisory Continues For Mount St. Helens
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WE HAVE SOME MAJOR VOLCANOES IN WA STATE

The agency issues weekly reports on seismic activity near the volcanoes. Nothing abnormal has been reported this year or last year. Washington's five major volcanoes are Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens and Glacier Peak.
The scientists say while the mountain was the star of the show on may 18th, 1980 the star of the show now is how life has come back big time to the area.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Watch Continues
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NOTHING SHAKING SO FAR THIS YEAR

In fact the United States Geological Service or USGS monitors volcanoes in Washington and Oregon's North Cascades region through its Cascades Volcano Observatory. The agency issues weekly reports on seismic activity near the volcanoes. Nothing abnormal has been reported this year or last year. Washington's five major volcanoes are Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens and Glacier Peak.

Mount St. Helens Eruption Watch Continues
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SADLY THE OBSERVATORY WON'T BE OPEN UNTIL MAYBE LATE 2026

You can find lots of information at the U. S. Forest service website. Sadly the road to the Johnston Ridge Observatory located at the end of State Highway 504 in the heart of the blast zone is closed until further notice because of a slide. A press release from the Washington State Department of Transportation says;
"The upper portion of State Route 504, which takes travelers to the Johnston Ridge Observatory located within the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, will remain closed until further notice following a massive debris slide. Due to the size of the slide and the instability of the hillside above the highway the road isn't expected to open until 2026."

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