City and county officials all across the U.S. are watching Portland, Oregon. That's because the Portland City Council has voted unanimously for new rules that will fine homeless up to $100 or place them in jail for seven days if they reject offers of shelter.

FINES FOR ACTIONS TAKEN BY HOMELESS AS WELL

If there's no shelter available Portland officials say the same fine applies to those homeless people who block sidewalks, start warming fires or use gas heaters. Also under the new rules no items can be more than 2 feet outside of structures or tents. Enforcement won't start for several weeks but the new ordinance is now in effect.

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FOR HOMELESS WHO DO ACCEPT HELP WILL GET FOOD AND SHELTER

The fines and jail time are for those who don't accept help. For homeless who do agree they'll be taken to a shelter nearby. Under the ordinance authorities do give homeless the choice of getting help, emergency shelter or housing rather than jail time or fines.

CITY AND COUNTY OFFICIALS ARE WATCHING TO SEE IF THEY CAN TAKE THE SAME ACTION IN OTHER AREAS

All eyes continue to be on the state of Oregon. In fact the U.S. Supreme Court is now contemplating if it's legal for cities to site or punish people who sleep outside when there's no space available in shelters after hearing a case brought by Grants Pass, Oregon.

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CITIES ARE DESPERATE FOR ANSWERS

The new ordinance is designed to go along with Oregon law which says cities in the state must have  “objectively reasonable” rules on public camping.  City and county officials all around the United States and in Yakima are watching Portland, Oregon as they search for legal ways to control homeless camping in public areas like streets and parks.

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