This is the second freeze warning I have seen for the Yakima Valley and beyond, still not waking up to frozen car windows, but I know it's on the way. Our first snow in the mountains took place this weekend and if you're curious when we're having our first in town CLICK HERE.

According to Accuweather Tuesday, October 12th, 2021's freeze warning will go into effect at 3 am and wrap up at 9 am. Last night's dip in temperature didn't seem to do much damage but we're in the very beginning so it's time, if you'd like to prep for spring.

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Weeding

This is the time if you have a bunch of weeds or you've completed harvested on your fruits and veggies to clean up each plant and the surrounding area. You can for sure wait until spring but why not get a head start before it gets bone-chilling cold? Then you'll have a better eye for what you plan on doing next.

Cover Your Flowers

This year was my first growing hydrangeas and I read you can just leave them be or cut off the flowers if you catch them in time the color will stay and you can dry them! Then you can cover the bottoms of each plant with leaves to help protect them during the frost

Chop Your Pumpkins

It's the time! If you've been growing pumpkins, it's time for harvest. We ended up with two and after chopping one of them rolled down our little hill and I was convinced it was haunted until I caught Winifred, our cat, acting like the pumpkin was trying to attack her! SUPER cute and one of the most fun items to grow so far. No sense in leaving the vines to wither in the colder weather. I will dig it up and get that area ready for next year's crop! The plan is to add blue pumpkins, mini pumpkins, cinderella, and goblin pumpkins!

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