Thinking of Labor Day reminds me of the time I worked a four hour shift before deciding to quit.

It was just after high school and I wasn't wanting to go to college just yet, but certainly needed a way to make my own money as no girl wants to hang out with a guy who has to bum money from my parents to go on a date. It was bad enough I was still living in my parent's house at the time.

So, like most, I applied to every place I could within walking distance. It was about a month later I got a call from a nearby sandwich shop asking if I wanted to work there. Since school just started, many of their Summer helpers were going back to school. I figured any job was good enough for me so I went in that day to fill out the paperwork. That's when one of the current employees came up to me and said, "I'm glad you're here! I know you're just filling this stuff out today but could you fill in for me as soon as you're done." I figured no time like the present so right after I finish the paperwork, I grabbed a shirt and started right away.

It was during the lunch rush so I quickly learned their art of making sandwiches and actually kind of enjoyed it. I did pretty well on my first day on the job, if you ask me.

After my four hour shift I went home to find another place I had applied for also called up to ask if I still wanted to work. The place that called while I was in the sandwich shop was the place I wanted to work at most as I was applying to everywhere else. I called the sandwich place, thanked them for their time but told them I was going with the other guys. No harm, no foul and, hey! I got sandwich-making experience and earned $16.14 with a free small sandwich out of it. Not bad!

All experience is good experience, but that shift was the shortest time I was ever employed. I left on good terms and still ate there. That's the true testament of any business -- if you can work there and still eat there, I think you're good to go.